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  • Locations: Auschwitz, Poland; Krakow, Poland; Lublin, Poland; Warsaw, Poland; Wroclaw, Poland
  • Program Terms: Summer
  • Restrictions: DPU applicants only
  • Click for Tuition + Program Fee: Summer
  • This program is currently not accepting applications.
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Program Type: Short-term Academic Level: Undergraduate
Recommended GPA: 2.5 Living Arrangements: Hotel
Language of Instruction: English Liberal Studies Domain: EL, Seminar on Multiculturalism in the U.S.
Study Abroad Contact: Julianne Angeli
Program Description:
Streets of Poland
Through travels to Warsaw, Lublin, Oświęcim and Kraków we will investigate how theatre and other kinds of performance can be a means to understand the Holocaust. As we engage with the narratives and issues of one of history’s worst atrocities, we will also learn about the wonderful culture that once was between Jews, Poles, Germans, Slovaks, Czech and more; and how it is going through a resurgence, even as there is still an absence of memory. We will visit museums, go on walking tours as well as to cathedrals and even a castle, go on a boat cruise, dine in excellent restaurants and be hosted at many Jewish centers, synagogues, and theatre/performance locations. Utilizing the resources in these cities we will visit the reconstructed Old Town of Warsaw and the POLIN: Polish-Jewish Museum which ranks second to the Louvre of must-see museums in Europe; see the beauty of out-of-the-way cities like Wrocław home of the Grotowski International Theatre Institute; and we will also attend Kraków’s Jewish Cultural Arts Festival, with over 30,000 attendees. So, questions that will guide us are both in aesthetic concerns, to understand how stories are told that give us knowledge, understanding, empathy, and hope. And what are the many multicultural lenses we need to wear in ‘seeing' the Holocaust? This course endeavors to gain understanding through a visceral, deep encounter that is both intellectually and emotionally life-changing. Also the nightlife in the large cities of Warsaw, Prague and Krakow is wonderful - with the Jewish quarters being some of the most “hip” in Europe. Theatre and performance provide a unique understanding of this cataclysmic event. History, identity, memory, social responsibility, faith, and diversity all become viscerally compelling through the representations of the Holocaust.

Theatre and performance provide a unique understanding of this cataclysmic event. History, identity, memory, social responsibility, faith, and diversity all become viscerally compelling through the representations of the Holocaust.

 

David Y. Chack is faculty at The Theatre School at DePaul University and is also Executive Director of the Alliance for Jewish Theatre, a worldwide organization for professional and semi-professional theatremakers. He has produced and directed theatre in Chicago and around the country through ShPIeL-Performing Identity Theatre. He is also looking forward to producing and co-creating the Midwest premiere of “The Green Book” with Pegasus Theatre, Chicago. He facilitated the first exhibition on "From the Bowery to Broadway: The Yiddish Theatre and New York Theatre" at the Museum of the City of New York. He has also written numerous articles on theatre for American Theatre, HowlRound, All About Jewish Theatre, The Forward, Chicago Jewish News, and other periodicals. He did his doctoral work at Boston University under Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel, the author of "Night" and at Tufts University with renowned theatre scholar Laurence Senelick, and he has a BFA in acting from Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and Circle in the Square Theatre.
 
Carol A. Ely is adjunct faculty at The Theatre School at DePaul University and is also Professor in Museum Studies, Public History, Museum Theatre, and American History at the University of Louisville. She has written histories of the Jewish communities of Charlottesville and Louisville, curated many exhibitions, and is Executive Director of Historic Locust Grove in Louisville.
 

All students will be enrolled in the following course:
 
Course LSP 200: The Holocaust Represented Through Theatre and Performance
***Students who have already taken an LSP 200 class will be instead be registered in a SAP 200 Experiential Learning class.
Credits 4 credit hours
Term registered Spring
Class meeting times Classes are likely to take place on Tuesday afternoons, but the faculty will work with all accepted students to find a time that works for everyone.
Liberal Studies domain Seminar on Multiculturalism in the U.S., Experiential Learning
Taught by David Chack
Course description This course investigates representations of the Holocaust through theatre and performances (including film), fictional and documentary, with their implications and considerations—the Holocaust being defined as the systematic anti-Jewish, racist, and genocidal activities perpetrated by Nazi Germany and furthered in Europe and other peoples leading to and during World War II.

  Please note that although some courses are registered in a particular term, some coursework or final assignments may be due in a different term. E.g. Course registered in winter quarter, but coursework is due in spring quarter once the travel component of the program is complete.
 

Students will stay in shared rooms in hotels.
 

We will be met and hosted by the Taube Center for Jewish Renewal in Warsaw, Poland. We will go to museums, go on walking tours, visit cathedrals and castle, go on a boat cruise, dine in excellent restaurants and be hosted at many Jewish centers, synagogues, and theatre/performance locations. Also the nightlife in the large cities of Warsaw and Krakow is also wonderful - with the Jewish quarters being some of the most “hip” in Europe. And the historic town centers in the smaller towns like Wrocław, untouched by WWII are beautiful in their architecture. The program will then conclude with the music, performance, and food (including a 700 person Friday Night Shabbat dinner) at the Jewish Arts and Culture Festival in Krakow, which is one of the largest in the world with over 30,000 people over the course of two packed weeks of festivities. Click this link for more information!

 

All students participating in study abroad will be charged both tuition (billed at the regular DePaul tuition rate, based on the number of credits enrolled) and a program fee. Please read the program fee details carefully to understand exactly what is included, as this can vary from program to program. If the program fee is posted, be sure to note whether the fee is current or from a previous year (past program fees may serve as a guide until the current program fee is available). If the current program fee has not yet been posted, please check back closer to the application deadline. Please also note the withdrawal policy.

DePaul offers several types of scholarships for students studying abroad, and students should visit the scholarship page early in the application process for information on eligibility and deadlines.

 

If you are planning to study abroad and do not have a passport, apply for one immediately. Some programs require travelers to obtain visas. In that case, contact the local consulates or embassies of the countries you will be visiting for up-to-date instructions on how to apply for them. Please note, however, that visa requirements can change. Study Abroad will update this website to reflect changes to the visa requirements as they become available.
 

Here are some helpful tips from former students who have participated in this program:
  • Practice being punctual if you aren't already as the goup travels together.
  • Download WhatsApp for easy international communication.
  • Talk to the tour guide and the faculty as much as you can.
  • Be aware of your surroundings and landmarks when you have to travel with a friend or on your own so you do not get lost.
  • Make friends prior to the trip, or don't hesitate to befriend locals! Explore the local scene during off time, meet people and see live music.
  • Although most people speak English, it's generally helpful to learn some of the language.
  • Be open to theatre exercises and workshops because that is really what the program is all about.
  • Be prepared for in-depth discussions about theatre and how everything you see relates back to the theatre.
  • Having some kind of outlet for emotional debriefs after long days of seeing and talking about the Holocaust is necessary. It is not an easy trip mentally or emotionally so it is imperative that there be some kind of self-care routine that you have in order to process what you are seeing and learning.
  • Pack walking shoes!

DePaul University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, or handicap in admissions, employment, or the provision of services. Inquiries regarding this policy should be addressed to the Director of Human Resources, 1 East Jackson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60604.

Circumstances, such as an unexpected event abroad or a curriculum change, may require DePaul University to make changes to the program. DePaul University reserves the right to cancel or alter programs and courses without notice.
Circumstances, such as an unexpected event abroad or a curriculum change, may require DePaul University to make changes to the program. DePaul University reserves the right to cancel or alter programs and courses without notice.

Dates / Deadlines:

Thank you for your interest in this program! We are not currently accepting applications. In general, applications open about 6 months before program application deadlines.

This program is currently not accepting applications.