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Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Program Type: Short-term Academic Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
Recommended GPA: 2.2 Prerequisite: None
Liberal Studies Domain: EL, HI, SCBI Study Abroad Contact: Dominique Brown
Program Description:
German river

Join us in Berlin, Germany this summer for one of the most innovative and compelling summer study abroad programs available -- “Law and Critical Social Justice.” Each course in the program incorporates Berlin as part of the “living classroom” through which students will examine major world events as they relate to law and social justice lawyering. The program seeks to explore the critical traditions in human rights law and how they relate to specific justice struggles confronting immigrants, religious minorities, communities of color, women, LGBT, and trans*people in Germany and the U.S.

In this program, students will study in the heart of the city at the storied Humboldt University in Berlin (HU-Berlin), a host institution chosen for its tradition for excellence and criticality. HU-Berlin is one of the most prestigious universities in Europe and the world, with 29 Nobel Prize winners and notable alumni and professors or lecturers, including leading intellects and talents of the 19th and 20th century, such as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Albert Einstein, Georg W.F. Hegel, Felix Mendelsohn, the Brothers Grimm, Herbert Marcuse, and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will hear from some of the most cutting-edge thinkers in law and humanities through the programs collaboration with the Law & Society Institute and Gender Studies at HU Berlin. According to the latest 2014 World Reputation Ratings by Times Higher Education magazine, HU-Berlin is the 27th best university in the world for its Humanities research, and is considered the 80th best university in Overall World Reputation rankings.

 

Gil Gott (DePaul University, International Studies) is fluent in both English and German and holds a PhD in German (UC Berkeley) as well as a JD from University of Illinois. Professor Gott has been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in Germany for his research on international law and nuclear weapons deployment. He also received a German Academic Exchange Service (“DAAD”) Scholarship for his project on Re-presenting the Past & the Holocaust. His research focuses on Critical Security Studies, Race and Foreign Affairs Law, and International Legal Theory. Before joining the International Studies department, he taught the international law curriculum at the DePaul law school. He is a well-respected and popular teacher who has received multiple teaching awards, including DePaul’s University Teaching Award.
 

All students will be enrolled in the following 2 courses:
 
Course Intersectionality and Human Rights
Credits 2 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description The course will examine structural disadvantage and social injustices faced by intersectional subjects. In order to do this, students will study intersectionality theory as it has developed in the United States and trace how well it has “traveled” to Europe across the Atlantic. Students will engage social justice praxis by applying intersectionality theory they learn in the classroom to the work of Berlin based NGOs such as Da Migra and ReachOut Berlin working to address specific problems intersectional subjects confront involving asylum, residency, or hate violence. Students will also consider the extent to which intersectional analysis has been embraced in (or can be applied to) laws of the U.S. and Germany/Europe as well as international human rights law more generally. A major focal point involves the deployment of national and international norms of “rights” to address particular identity-based inclusions/exclusions.
Course History, Memory and Law
Credits 3 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description Using experiential learning, students will consider how lessons from historical traumas can inform contemporary strategies of inclusion and anti-subordination of minorities in Europe, the United States, or other parts of the world today. This course will showcase Berlin as part of the “living classroom” through which we will examine major 20th century world events to see how history and the social construction of remembering map onto a region’s laws, legal culture, and understanding of human rights. Students will analyze discrete topics, such as genocide, forced labor, colonialism and immigration, from both German/European and U.S. perspectives and then visit relevant sites in Berlin related to these topics. Class members will contemplate the role that history and the process of remembering and forgetting historical traumas play in influencing a country’s legal regime and system.
      Please note that although some courses are registered in a particular term, some coursework or final assignments may be due in a different term. E.g. Course registered in winter quarter, but coursework is due in spring quarter once the travel component of the program is complete.

All students will be enrolled in the following 2 courses:
 
Course FMS 450: Intersectionality
Credits 4 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description Students will apply classroom theory to contemporary problems faced by constituents of Berlin nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) working with migrant and refugee populations. Students will also contemplate how human rights and transnational lawyering might assist Berliners facing multiple sources of discrimination.
Additional course information This course, along with another 78 hours interning at one of our partner Berlin NGOs, satisfies the 150-hour Summer Internship requirement for FMS 450.
Course FMS 406 or 414: Human Rights and History, Memory, and Law
Credits 4 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description Students will consider how lessons from historical traumas can inform contemporary strategies of inclusion and anti-subordination of minorities in Europe, the United States or other parts of the world. Students will analyze how topics such as genocide, forced labor, colonialism and immigration are reflected in a society’s law, policy and public history.
      Please note that although some courses are registered in a particular term, some coursework or final assignments may be due in a different term. E.g. Course registered in winter quarter, but coursework is due in spring quarter once the travel component of the program is complete.

All students will be enrolled in the following 2 courses:
 
Course PSC 363: Women and Law
Credits 4 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Liberal Studies domain Students will receive Social, Cultural, and Behavioral Inquiry (SCBI) credit by default. If students would prefer Experiential Learning (EL) credit, it is available by request at the time of course registration, prior to the start of the quarter.
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description This course investigates the variety of ways in which women come into relation with the law, focusing on laws and judicial decisions dealing with equal opportunity.
Course HST 269: Museums, Material Culture, and Memory--Introduction to Public History
Credits 4 credit hours
Term registered Summer 2020
Liberal Studies domain Students will receive Historical Inquiry (HI) credit by default. If students would prefer Experiential Learning (EL) credit, it is available by request at the time of course registration, prior to the start of the quarter.
Taught by Gil Gott
Course description How is the past remembered in public venues like museums? How do history museums shape how we understand past? How do historians use material culture (objects like coins or folk art) to interpret the past for the public? Public history refers to history that you find in public spaces-- outside of the pages of academic journals, and beyond university walls. We encounter examples of public history through exhibits, performances, walking tours, visits to historic sites, the world wide web, etc. This course familiarizes you with examples of public history, and trains you to critically analyze and thoughtfully engage with public historical interpretations.
    Please note that although some courses are registered in a particular term, some coursework or final assignments may be due in a different term. E.g. Course registered in winter quarter, but coursework is due in spring quarter once the travel component of the program is complete.

Program tuition does not include housing, but Berlin has many housing options in all ranges and most proprietors speak English, making it easy to rent an apartment or reserve hostel or hotel accommodations. Students are responsible for finding and paying for their own accommodations.
 

All students participating in study abroad will be charged both tuition (billed at the regular DePaul tuition rate, based on the number of credits enrolled) and a program fee. Please read the program fee details carefully to understand exactly what is included, as this can vary from program to program. If the program fee is posted, be sure to note whether the fee is current or from a previous year (past program fees may serve as a guide until the current program fee is available). If the current program fee has not yet been posted, please check back closer to the application deadline. Please also note the withdrawal policy.

DePaul offers several types of scholarships for students studying abroad, and students should visit the scholarship page early in the application process for information on eligibility and deadlines.

 

If you are planning to study abroad and do not have a passport, apply for one immediately. Some programs require students to obtain student visas. In that case, contact the country's local consulate or embassy for up-to-date instructions. Please note that visa requirements can change quickly. Study Abroad will update this website to reflect changes as they become available.
 

Here are some helpful tips from former students who have participated in this program:
  • Try to secure a room that has a kitchen area.
  • Paying out of pocket for food every day is really expensive, so try finding a grocery store nearby. Also, learn the names of food in the language to easily grocery shop and order off of a menu.
  • Keep Euros on you- a lot of places don't take cards.
  • Make sure that you understand what you're paying for and signing up for housing-wise.
  • Make sure to bring comfortable shoes and an ice pack.
  • Get immersed in the culture by learning the basics of the language and engaging with locals.
  • Bring clothes for all kinds of weather.
  • There are major differences in culture, therefore be prepared for situations you may not have expected.
  • Be polite and quiet on public transport.
  • If you are easily overwhelmed, take into account that this program engages a lot with course content and has a heavier workload, as this is a highly academic trip. There isn't much downtime, so make sure you know what you definitely want to see while you're there!

DePaul University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, or handicap in admissions, employment, or the provision of services. Inquiries regarding this policy should be addressed to the Director of Human Resources, 1 East Jackson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60604.

Circumstances, such as an unexpected event abroad or a curriculum change, may require DePaul University to make changes to the program. DePaul University reserves the right to cancel or alter programs and courses without notice.


Dates / Deadlines:
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Admissions Notification Date Start Date End Date
Summer 2020 05/01/2020 ** Rolling Admission 07/19/2020 08/13/2020
NOTE: Applicants seeking the program fee supplement option that includes pre-reserved housing are strongly encouraged to apply by April 10. Applicants who not seeking the program fee supplement option, are strongly encouraged to apply by April 15, but applications may be accepted on a space-available basis through May 1. A very limited number of undergraduate or graduate students with a minimum 3.0 and background in international law or human rights may also be admitted to the program with the approval of co-program director Professor Gil Gott (DePaul International Studies). Consult Professor Gil Gott at ggott@depaul.edu for more details.

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.